1. elbowplants:

I really like this. It crystallizes a lot of thoughts I’ve had about writing as reducing airy, expansive moments into dense little cubes. Going to the beach and presenting someone with a shell you found in the sand and saying “this is what it was like.” I love what he said about trying & failing, in writing, to “get closer to the moment.” I left reporting for essentially this reason. Journalism school’s ‘truth’ obsession is bullshit not just for the obvious reasons like people have different biases & humans interpret the world differently but because language doesn’t tell the truth of moments, like the real deep embedded truth. That’s something you feel. Thanks to Sam Cooke for sharing this

    elbowplants:

    I really like this. It crystallizes a lot of thoughts I’ve had about writing as reducing airy, expansive moments into dense little cubes. Going to the beach and presenting someone with a shell you found in the sand and saying “this is what it was like.” I love what he said about trying & failing, in writing, to “get closer to the moment.” I left reporting for essentially this reason. Journalism school’s ‘truth’ obsession is bullshit not just for the obvious reasons like people have different biases & humans interpret the world differently but because language doesn’t tell the truth of moments, like the real deep embedded truth. That’s something you feel. Thanks to Sam Cooke for sharing this

    Reblogged from: elbowplants
  2. mistakes are welcomed here

    mistakes are welcomed here

    Reblogged from: darciewilder
  3. she was special and unique because unlike other girls she read a book and drank a tea and didnt talk about a clothes

    young adult authors everywhere 

     

    #she was also hetero and she liked to look at the stars at night

    #And she was an old soul who raised herself, also her eyes were deep pools

    #And she didn’t wear makeup but it was okay because she had flawless skin anyway

    (via beepboopboopbeep)

    #and she could be found wearing a clothes but nothing of a fashion clothes her clothes were a charming geek style with maybe some glasses and odd quirks

    (via nethilia)

    #Again, did we mention that she was White as fuck?

    (via witchsistah)

    Reblogged from: zachbot3000
  4. If you’re a boy writer, it’s a simple rule: you’ve gotta get used to the fact that you suck at writing women and that the worst women writer can write a better man than the best male writer can write a good woman. And it’s just the minimum. Because the thing about the sort of heteronormative masculine privilege, whether it’s in Santo Domingo, or the United States, is you grow up your entire life being told that women aren’t human beings, and that women have no independent subjectivity. And because you grow up with this, it’s this huge surprise when you go to college and realize that, “Oh, women aren’t people who does my shit and fucks me.”

    And I think that this a huge challenge for boys, because they want to pretend they can write girls. Every time I’m teaching boys to write, I read their women to them, and I’m like, “Yo, you think this is good writing?” These motherfuckers attack each other over cliche lines but they won’t attack each other over these toxic representations of women that they have inherited… their sexist shorthand, they think that is observation. They think that their sexist distortions are insight. And if you’re in a writing program and you say to a guy that their characters are sexist, this guy, it’s like you said they fucking love Hitler. They will fight tooth and nail because they want to preserve this really vicious sexism in the art because that is what they have been taught.

    And I think the first step is to admit that you, because of your privilege, have a very distorted sense of women’s subjectivity. And without an enormous amount of assistance, you’re not even going to get a D. I think with male writers the most that you can hope for is a D with an occasional C thrown in. Where the average women writer, when she writes men, she gets a B right off the bat, because they spent their whole life being taught that men have a subjectivity. In fact, part of the whole feminism revolution was saying, “Me too, motherfuckers.” So women come with it built in because of the society.

    It’s the same way when people write about race. If you didn’t grow up being a subaltern person in the United States, you might need help writing about race. Motherfuckers are like ‘I got a black boy friend,’ and their shit sounds like Klan Fiction 101.

    The most toxic formulas in our cultures are not pass down in political practice, they’re pass down in mundane narratives. It’s our fiction where the toxic virus of sexism, racism, homophobia, where it passes from one generation to the next, and the average artist will kill you before they remove those poisons. And if you want to be a good artist, it means writing, really, about the world. And when you write cliches, whether they are sexist, racist, homophobic, classist, that is a fucking cliche. And motherfuckers will kill you for their cliches about x, but they want their cliches about their race, class, queerness. They want it in there because they feel lost without it. So for me, this has always been the great challenge.

    As a writer, if you’re really trying to write something new, you must figure out, with the help of a community, how can you shed these fucking received formulas. They are received. You didn’t come up with them. And why we need fellow artists is because they help us stay on track. They tell you, “You know what? You’re a bit of a fucking homophobe.” You can’t write about the world with these simplistic distortions. They are cliches. People know art, always, because they are uncomfortable. Art discomforts. The trangressiveness of art has to deal with confronting people with the real. And sexism is a way to avoid the real, avoiding the reality of women. Homophobia is to avoid the real, the reality of queerness. All these things are the way we hide from encountering the real. But art, art is just about that.

    Junot Diaz speaking at Word Up: Community Bookshop in 2012 (via barriobabe)
    Reblogged from: angfdz
  5. flaggedandremoved:

    flagged and removed is going to be an ebook via Vigliano Books

    will include: stuff on this website + new stuff

    a thing im doing

    Reblogged from: flaggedandremoved
  6. eileenlm:

    four of the tumblrs i follow are darcie (that’s 22.2%!)

    wait what changed

    Reblogged from: eileenlm
  7. RAMBLING ABOUT ZACH LENNON-SIMON IN A WAY THAT I HOPE IS LESS SOLIPSISTIC THAN HOW SOLIPSISTIC I FEEL THE BLOG ENTRY IS

    recommending zach lennon-simon’s  film. (2012, narrative, 18min 52secs)

    zach is one of my favorite people and probably the best writer I know. i contemplated making a list of “good zach memories,” but it became too long and would only interest me and zach.

    something i feel about zach’s work that is crazysexycool: no matter the chosen medium, i feel that his work always seems to effortlessly fit the mode of communication/art/etc. effortlessly to mean: perfectly and appropriately, without struggle. (not to mean: without putting effort into it, which is completely opposite of my experiences with him) his work, much like his personality, adapts to nearly any situation without sacrificing the essence/core/thesis/spirit of the work. i’ve never seen him produce any work that didn’t seem “in line” with his personality or ethos, and each piece of work understands itself as a piece of that work: his documentaries function as documentaries, his prose functions strongly as a piece of prose, his narrative films (such as above) are narrative films. they all work with the structure to benefit themselves instead of fighting the structure/medium, they are themselves in harmony with the medium, not despite it / like works of art where the criticism is “it is/says it is THIS but is so atypical of THIS that it is saying THAT”

    i realized this while watching zach’s vlogs, [available HERE] which are pretty conventional vlogs (from what little of vlogs ive seen) yet capture, to me, what his perspective is and what it’s like to be his friend. i think i am mentioned in two, one by name and as “a friend” who accompanied him when he went to his dorm to get scotch and a lightsaber before a party (madeline manning’s glitter jungle of the future themed birthday party)

    difficult choice: whether to link to the above film or his documentary:

    This is for the kids

    we shot that pretty much alone, driving around brooklyn, rapping along to embarrassing songs and confiding in each other whatever terrible thing we had just done to a romantic interest.

    every day we stopped at 5 and got pizza, usually with a hoard of elementary/middle school kids, who had just been released from whatever.

    one afternoon this kid said to another, “do you know that if your hand is bigger than your head you have cancer?” and the other kid said, “i know that trick,” refusing to put his hand in front of his head because he knew that as soon as he did, the first kid would slap his hand into his face. so the first kid, refusing to succumb to defeat, just slapped the other kid in the face anyway, like with his own hand. he knew what he wanted to do and he did it.

    anyway, i didn’t work on this (probably because i had a difficult time getting along with others at the time) but you can see me in some of the background shots of the final party scene.

    i would LOVE it if zach wrote my eulogy

  8. accidentally posted to my public tumblr immediately after posting about how i had just accidentally posted to my public tumblr instead of my secret tumblr

  9. finally manifested my fear of posting to my public tumblr instead of myfuckingsecretblog

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